JENNY JASKEY , “THE VILLAGES” FEATURING ERIK BLINDERMAN & LISA RAVE, 2012, “YOUNG CURATORS, NEW IDEAS IV,” INSTALLATION VIEW

JENNY JASKEY, “THE VILLAGES” FEATURING ERIK BLINDERMAN & LISA RAVE, 2012, “YOUNG CURATORS, NEW IDEAS IV,” INSTALLATION VIEW

 

Young Curators, New Ideas V

Open Call for Exhibition Proposals

Detroit Art Week (July 16 – 21, 2019), an annual self-guided tour and citywide celebration of contemporary art in Detroit, is now accepting applications from national and international curators for the 5th iteration of “Young Curators, New Ideas.” In 2008, Detroit Art Week Founding Director, Amani Olu, established the series to promote and support emerging curatorial voices. After a six-year hiatus, "YCNI V” will take place from Wednesday, July 17 to Sunday, July 21, 2019 at Trumbull & Porter Hotel Detroit. No age restrictions apply.

Featuring 12 independent curators selected from an international open call, “YCNI V” will shine a light on the cultural, artistic, social and political transformations initiated by women, LGBTQ and gender-non-conforming individuals through their creative, and at times independent, curatorial practices. With a sense of relevance and urgency, these multifaceted and dynamic micro-exhibitions will consider contemporary issues that exist at the intersection of curatorial practice and artistic production. Within a 256 square-foot hotel room, each curator will present one or two artists whose work is a thoughtful and provocative discussion on the most pressing issues of our time.

Since its inception, “Young Curators, New Ideas” has presented exhibitions by 31 independent curators featuring 104 artists.

“YCNI” alums include: Karen Archey, Curator of Contemporary Art for Time-Based Media at Stedelijk Museum; Erin Dziedzic, Director of Curatorial Affairs at the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art; Stamatina Gregory, Associate Dean of the School of Art at The Cooper Union; Jenny Jaskey, Director of The Artists’ Institute; Larry Ossei-Mensah, Susanne Feld Hilberry Senior Curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit; Laura Ptak, Executive Director and Curator of Art in General; Stephanie Roach, Director of The Flag Art Foundation; Jose Ruiz, Director of the MFA in Curatorial Practice program at the Maryland Institute College of Art; Legacy Russell, Associate Curator at Studio Museum in Harlem; Andrew Russeth, Executive Editor of ARTnews; Lumi Tan, Curator at The Kitchen; and Cleopatra’s [Bridget Donahue, Bridget Finn, Kate McNamara & Erin Somerville] to name a few.

Past participating artists include: Michele Abeles, A.K. Burns, Talia Chetrit, Tyler Coburn, Craig Drennen, Bryan Graf, Hugo McCloud, Erin Jane Nelson, Jessica Ann Peavy, Alex Prager, Josh Reames, Asha Schechter, Adam Parker Smith, Jaret Vadera, Jeffrey Vallance, Hannah Whitaker, Bryan Zanisnik and AIDS-3D to name a few.

Application Fees + Deadlines

Non-refundable application fee: $100
Non-refundable late application fee: $150
Application deadline: January 31, 2019
Late application deadline: February 15, 2019
Notification: March 1, 2019
Exhibition dates: July 17 – 21, 2019
 
 
  JORDANA ZELDIN , “ALL THE BOYS AND GIRLS” FEATURING BEN ALPER & JUDITH SHIMER, 2012, “YOUNG CURATORS, NEW IDEAS IV,” INSTALLATION VIEW

JORDANA ZELDIN, “ALL THE BOYS AND GIRLS” FEATURING BEN ALPER & JUDITH SHIMER, 2012, “YOUNG CURATORS, NEW IDEAS IV,” INSTALLATION VIEW

 

Exhibition Thesis

In 1998, Michael Brenson famously wrote in Art Journal that “the era of the curator has begun.” And so, it seems that everyone is calling themselves a curator these days. Over the past ten years especially, the reference to the curator has exploded in popular culture and as a consumer buzz-word. While everyone is busy curating playlists, drink menus and Pinterest boards, it seems that the art-world curator is still a title reserved for the few who can successfully finesse or appease institutional and commercial gatekeepers. Resources, power and influence, are just as consolidated as they ever have been, and perhaps more so as individuals and institutions react to the democratizing forces of social media with claims of expertise and connoisseurship. What is the process by which one becomes a curator? This question is especially relevant for young curators coming from intellectual, cultural and/or artistic traditions that have been seen as backward, primitive, minor or inconsequential to the history of art and ideas; as they attempt to break through entrenched structural and institutional barriers to assert themselves as curators and experiment with or destabilize contemporary curatorial practices.

The question of how one becomes a curator – and whose labor is recognized as curatorship – is also especially relevant to women, LGBTQ communities and gender non-conforming people. Elke Krasny puts forth that “firstly, independent curating was crucial to transforming modern art into contemporary art [and that] secondly, many of the independent curators who were profoundly shaping this transformation were feminists, active as feminist artists, art historians, activists, thinkers, and public intellectuals.” Yet, in 2018, according to the National Museum of Women in the Arts, women are a long way off from achieving parity in the arts. For example, women working across arts professions make an average of $20,000 less per year than their male counterparts. With this historical knowledge in mind, we must presently attend to the kinds of labor that go unnoticed and undervalued. Further, Krasny writes, “we need to raise the question: what are the current transformations initiated by feminist and queer-feminist curating whose politics and practices we witness today telling us?” Though many may not explicitly identify with the label feminist, women, LGBTQ communities and gender non-conforming people are undoubtedly concerned with questions of power, domination and social control, concerns with which feminist social critiques also share. “Young Curators, New Ideas” will shine a light on the cultural, artistic, social and political transformations initiated by women, LGBTQ and gender-non-conforming individuals through their creative, and at times independent, curatorial practices. With a sense of relevance and urgency, these multifaceted and dynamic micro-exhibitions consider contemporary issues that exist at the intersection of curatorial practice and artistic production.
 
 
  ARIELLA WOLENS , “INTERPRETATIONS OF THE FRAME AND GESTURE,” FEATURING PAN ATERSON, MIRANDA PISSARIDES & PREM SAHIB, 2012, “YOUNG CURATORS, NEW IDEAS IV,” INSTALLATION VIEW

ARIELLA WOLENS, “INTERPRETATIONS OF THE FRAME AND GESTURE,” FEATURING PAN ATERSON, MIRANDA PISSARIDES & PREM SAHIB, 2012, “YOUNG CURATORS, NEW IDEAS IV,” INSTALLATION VIEW

 

Eligibility + Guidelines

Eligibility
• Independent curators and curatorial groups are eligible to apply.
• Artists and individuals affiliated with a not-for-profit are eligible to apply.
• 501c3 organizations are eligible to apply.
• “Young Curators, New Ideas” alums are eligible to apply.
• Commercial galleries are not eligible to apply.

Guidelines
• “Young Curators, New Ideas” is open to independent curators working in all disciplines.
• There is no age restriction.
• We will only accept proposals for one- and two-person exhibitions. We will not consider proposals for group exhibitions.
•We will give extra consideration to proposals that fit the exhibition’s theme of inclusion and diversity and engage viewers in a thoughtful and provocative discussion on the most pressing issues of our time. “Young Curators, New Ideas V,” will not only privilege historically oppressed and institutionally underrepresented voices in curatorship and the global art market, but also set the stage to center contemporary artists’ perspectives on:
 
/ gender
/ sexuality
/ the body
/ global migration
/ the political economy
/ climate change
/ war and violence
/ ethical dilemmas in the development of science and technology
/ social stratification and racial hierarchies
 
 
  CALDER ZWICKY , “SIGILS” FEATURING PETER HOBBS & ADAM PARKER SMITH, 2012, “YOUNG CURATORS, NEW IDEAS IV,” INSTALLATION VIEW

CALDER ZWICKY, “SIGILS” FEATURING PETER HOBBS & ADAM PARKER SMITH, 2012, “YOUNG CURATORS, NEW IDEAS IV,” INSTALLATION VIEW

 

Submission Requirements

• Applicant Curriculum Vitae
• Narrative Bio – up to 200 words
• A short synopsis of the exhibition – up to 75 words
• Detailed exhibition proposal – up to 1000 words
• Artist 1 Bio – up to 200 words, CV, website or Insta
• Artist 2 Bio – up to 200 words, CV, website or Insta
• All applications submitted will be considered final. Applicants will not be permitted to edit an application once it has been sent. We will disqualify all incomplete or duplicate applications.

Please note:
• There is no “save” option. Save your application in a separate document before submitting.
• We will not accept applications after the late deadline (Feb. 15, 2019).
• We will not accept proposals nor applications via email.
 

Image Submission

We will request high-resolution images after your proposal has been accepted.
Do not submit images with your proposal.
 
 
  LEGACY RUSSELL , “ERRATUM” FEATURING AMY BEECHER, A. K. BURNS & JULIA WEIST, 2012, “YOUNG CURATORS, NEW IDEAS IV,” INSTALLATION VIEW

LEGACY RUSSELL, “ERRATUM” FEATURING AMY BEECHER, A. K. BURNS & JULIA WEIST, 2012, “YOUNG CURATORS, NEW IDEAS IV,” INSTALLATION VIEW

 

Fine Print + Fees

• There is no room rental fee for independent curators, but you are required to sign a consignment agreement. All artworks included in the exhibition are subject to the terms of the consignment agreement. We will not permit artworks on the premises omitted from the consignment agreement. If you have any questions about the consignment terms, please contact us for details.

• Organizational applicants are required to pay a $1,500 room rental fee.

• Participants are allowed to sleep in the room in which they are exhibiting.

• Participants cannot install any artwork on the wall of the hotel room. No exceptions.

• Participants must pay a fully refundable $100 room damage deposit.
 
 
  RACHEL COOK , “NOT-NOT-NOT IMAGE-OBJECTS” FEATURING STERLING ALLEN, JILLIAN CONRAD & RYAN LAUDERDALE, 2012, “YOUNG CURATORS, NEW IDEAS IV,” INSTALLATION VIEW

RACHEL COOK, “NOT-NOT-NOT IMAGE-OBJECTS” FEATURING STERLING ALLEN, JILLIAN CONRAD & RYAN LAUDERDALE, 2012, “YOUNG CURATORS, NEW IDEAS IV,” INSTALLATION VIEW

 

Frequently Asked Questions

What are the age restrictions?
No age restrictions apply.

Am required to live in Detroit to apply for “Young Curators, New Ideas?”
This is an international open call.

Does Detroit Art Week provide funding?
Not at this time.

Is my application fee refundable?
All applications fees are non-refundable.

Can I hang art on the walls or suspend it from the ceiling?
Participants are not allowed to install artwork in any way.

Will the hotel remove all art from the walls as well as decorative objects?
The walls will be clear of the hotel’s art and decorative objects. Be creative in your presentation. You can lay works against walls, on the bed or on other furniture in the room.

Can I submit more than one proposal?
We will consider multiple proposals.

Must I leave a deposit with the hotel when I check in?
Yes, you will be required to leave a refundable $100 deposit when you check-in using a major credit card.

Can I sleep in the room in which I am exhibiting?
Yes, you are allowed to sleep in your room.

How many curatorial projects will Detroit Art Week select?
We will select 12 curatorial projects only.

Will you consider exhibition proposals that feature more than two artists?
No, we will only consider proposals that include one or two artists.

Am I allowed to sell artwork?
Yes, you are permitted to sell artwork, but you must sign a consignment agreement.