CAROLE HARRIS © KATE GOWMAN

CAROLE HARRIS © KATE GOWMAN

 ALLIE MCGHEE © KATE GOWMAN

ALLIE MCGHEE © KATE GOWMAN

 

Honorees

 
Carole Harris
Carole Harris is a fiber artist known for combining traditional and unconventional techniques to produce textiles so expressive in color and form that they rarely resemble classic quilts. The competing and harmonious relationships between humanity and nature, and their effects on the ever-changing cityscape inspires Harris, and often finds their way into her work, as does jazz, blues and gospel. Her awareness of visual traditions and her view of traditionally-overlooked stories in the buildings and layers of a city greatly influence her process. Harris often collects textiles from family and friends and stitches these tangible traces of memory into her quilts. In doing so, she incorporates the history of her community in Detroit into her work, giving life to the work, but also respecting the stories already embedded within each piece of fabric. Two hundred quilts and fifty-two years into her career as a fiber artist, Harris has exhibited extensively in galleries and museums nationally, including at the Smithsonian’s Renwick Gallery and New York’s Museum of Art & Design, as well as internationally in Europe, Asia, and South America.
 
Allie McGhee
In the 70s, Allie McGhee began to develop his visual language as an abstract painter. Abstract Expressionism, mythology, and science have all influenced his process. Jazz musicians have also had a significant impact on his work. Like improvisational jazz, his paintings often turn back in on themselves in stick-drawn swirls, or even structurally, subverting their rectangular origins in place of complex, multidimensional levels of canvas, paper and color. While predominantly a painter working in mixed-media, McGhee, along with artists such as Carrie Mae Weems, Barkley L. Hendricks, and Wangechi Mutu, has also lent his talents to sculpture and contributed a bust of Barack Obama to the “Visions of Our 44th President” project. His work is part of collections at the Detroit Institute of Arts, the Studio Museum in Harlem, the James Lewis Museum at Morgan State University, the St. Louis Art Museum, Japan's Toyota City Hall, and numerous museums and institutions.